Information Security

MalwareTech's VM1 Reversing Challenge

Get the challenge from here vm1.exe implements a simple 8-bit virtual machine (VM) to try and stop reverse engineers from retrieving the flag. The VM’s RAM contains the encrypted flag and some bytecode to decrypt it. Can you figure out how the VM works and write your own to decrypt the flag? A copy of the VM’s RAM has been provided in ram.bin (this data is identical to the ram content of the malware’s VM before execution and contains both the custom assembly code and encrypted flag).

hxp 36C3 CTF Writeups

The hxp CTF happens every year along with the Chaos Communication Congress (a top security conference). This year was the 36th edition. This CTF is a major CTF, you know this when the CTF has a rating weight of 63.0 on CTFTime. Also, it is one of the qualifier events of DEFCON 2020 CTF. I was playing solo on this one and gave one day to this CTF. I managed to solve 2 problems in the main CTF and 2 in the Junior CTF.

watevrCTF 2019 Writeups (Mainly Rev and Pwn)

This was a very fun CTF. Kudos to the organizers. I loved the problems, very interesting as well as challenging. I played this CTF with my team, Abs0lut3Pwn4g3. Our final rank was 54th. Rev Challeneges Timeout File: timeout The binary is unstripped, so we can easily see the main function. The disassembly looks something like this. The functions, signal, alarm and delay all serve the same purpose, basically to either exit the program or delay its execution for a long time.

TUCTF 2019 - Pwn & Rev Challenges

I couldn’t give much time to the CTF because of some college work, but I gave a shot at the PWN challenges. The challenges became offline later but I still decided to work on the exploit scripts to make them work locally. Pwn Challenges thefirst - 379 pts We can see in the image below that gets is being used to take the input. Hence it can be exploited for buffer overflow.

Privacy-preserving Machine Learning using Secure Multiparty Computation

Perform medical image classification in a secure and privacy-preserving manner using Secure Multiparty Computation and Differntial Privacy

RITSEC CTF 2019

A bit late for writeups, but still here are the solutions to the challenges I solved during the CTF. The CTF was from 15 Nov. 2019, 22:30 IST — Mon, 18 Nov. 2019, 10:30 IST. It was a decent CTF with quality challenges, from both beginner to advanced level. Update: The scripts to solve and the flags are present in this repo. I’ll do the writeups category-wise - Crypto  

Codefest’19 CTF Writeups

The Capture the Flag event for Codefest’19 was hosted from 8 pm, 23rd August 2019 to 12 noon, 24th August 2019 on Hackerrank. The contest link can be found here. There were a total of 1532 registrations and 518 people who were successful in solving atleast one challenge. So, onto the writeups. Welcome to Codefest 19! (Intro Challenge — 100pts) This was the introductory challenge. I had tried to make it a bit difficult than the normal introductory challenges, but I felt that it proved to be a bit difficult for the beginners.

Network Intrusion Detection in an Adversarial setting

A study on fooling Machine Learning/Deep Learning based Network Intrusion Detection systems to prevent them from detecting intrusions

Linux Malware detection using Machine Learning

Implemented various papers on Linux Malware detection, where I analysed the structure of ELF files to determine whether they were malicious or benign. Approaches included the analysis of - * Symbol Table * Opcode frequency * ELF file metadata

AngstromCTF Writeups

These are the writeups to the problems I solved during the AngstromCTF. MISC   1. Waldo1 We are given a zip file — flags.zip containing flags of countries. The file flag5.png, we see on opening has the flag. Flag-Waldo1   2. Waldo2 In this problem, we are given multiple flag images in a folder. Judging by the problem, it seems that one image is different.